Walsham le Willows, Suffolk

Walsham le Willows, Suffolk

Walsham-le-Willows is located around 2½ miles (4 km) south-east of Stanton, and lies in the Mid Suffolk council district.
Queen Elizabeth I had granted Walsham-le-Willows to Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, in 1559.

Because the village is documented unusually fully in surviving records of the time, the Cambridge historian John Hatcher chose to use it as the setting for his semi-fictionalised account of the effects of the mid-14th century plague epidemic in England, The Black Death: A Personal History (2008).[2]
Walsham-le-Willows has a Non-League football club Walsham-le-Willows F.C. currently in the Eastern Counties League who play at Sumner Road.
The Meadow has been the home of the village football and cricket clubs going back to the late 1800s and the old pavilion still survives on the far side of the ground.

Football and cricket were both played at the present ground in Summer Road until the outbreak of war when the field was ploughed up to provide land suitable to grow food on.

Football started up again after the war and was played at Grove Road in the village from 1947 and the club competed in the Bury & District league Division 2. A new pitch was developed on Gallents Meadow in Ixworth Road and used from1948 to 1951 (the reserve side was formed in 1949 to compete in the Bury village league) when the club moved back to its present site after the generosity of the Martineau family provided the grass seed to reseed the field.
The amalgamation of the cricket and football clubs in 1952 then formed Walsham le Willows Sports Club.

The clubs teams have participated in the Bury & District league, Bury Village league, Stowmarket league, Suffolk & Ipswich league and now the Ridgeons league.

Mercedes

Mercedes

The recent development over the road of 3 new pitches, car park, tennis court and artificial grass pitch 50m x 30m was completed in 2012 and provides us with some of the best facilities in the area.

Mercedes

Mercedes

Mercedes